Job Opportunity: Development and Engagement Coordinator (part-time)

Target Start Date: August 20, 2018

Reports to: Operations Director

Status: Part-time (~20hrs/week), hourly, non-exempt, temporary six-month position with a possible extension contingent on funding

Compensation & Benefits: $14/hour, PTO, professional development opportunities

We are looking for an adaptable and resilient Development and Engagement Coordinator to help us protect Central Oregon’s natural resources and livable communities. LandWatch believes that a happy, healthy, engaged team is critical to our success, and we acknowledge that an individual’s family structure, home life and cultural values impact their workplace needs. We strive to offer a respectful, flexible environment where work/life balance can be achieved to the greatest extent possible, as well as an environment where individuals feel valued, challenged, and supported in their professional goals.

Primary responsibilities will include:

·       Assisting Operations Director with coordination of fundraising events including auction item procurement, logistics and some volunteer management

·       Coordination of fundraising appeal letters

·       Positively and accurately representing the organization in the community at tabling events

·       Assist with the creation of content for emails, Facebook, Twitter and Instagram accounts

·       Assisting Operations Director with administrative tasks such as filing, distribution of materials and management of other office and program systems

·       Coordination of program related events and logistics

·       Assisting other staff as necessary

The ideal candidate for this position will have:

·       Enthusiasm for the mission and willingness to learn

·       Attention to detail and ability to manage multiple projects independently

·       Cultural competence and experience working with diverse groups

·       The ability to speak to the public on the organization’s behalf

·       Excellent communication skills  

·       Nonprofit experience in fundraising, marketing and communication and/or administration

·       Knowledge of social media platforms or willingness to learn

Please send a resume and cover letter to info@colw.org with “Job Opportunity” in the subject line by July 26, 2018

Central Oregon LandWatch is an equal opportunity employer and is committed to recruiting and hiring qualified employees without regard to age, class, ability, race, ethnicity, religion, national origin, gender, gender identity, sexual orientation, veteran status, or any other characteristic. We believe that environmental justice is an essential aspect of pursuing justice as a cause more broadly and that each person is inherently valuable as an individual and entitled to respect, consideration and inclusion.

Is piping a silver bullet for restoring Tumalo Creek?

A multi-million dollar public investment in water infrastructure should return every drop of conserved water to the river system

As one of only two cold-water inputs to the Middle Deschutes River, the health of Tumalo Creek is critical to the health of the overall Deschutes Basin system. It is imperative that Central Oregonians work together to find solutions to the current imbalance in how water is allocated. A recent proposal to pipe Tumalo Irrigation District’s canals would provide more water to the creek, but upon further analysis it may not be the silver bullet it appears to be.  

Tumalo Creek provides a peaceful refuge, outdoor recreation opportunities, and badly-needed crystal-clear cold water to the Middle Deschutes River. However, during irrigation season, very little Tumalo Creek water actually makes it to the confluence with the Deschutes due to Tumalo Irrigation District’s water withdrawals (the City of Bend also draws water from the Creek). River advocates have identified returning flows to Tumalo Creek as one of the highest priorities for restoring the ecology of the Deschutes River.

 Check Tumalo Creek's flows live! Visit OWRD's website by clicking  here , then choose a starting date, ending date, select dataset 'Instantaneous Flow,' and click 'Refresh Graph' to see how much water is currently reaching the Deschutes River.  For June, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife  recommends  a minimum of 47 cfs in this stretch for fish health.

Check Tumalo Creek's flows live! Visit OWRD's website by clicking here, then choose a starting date, ending date, select dataset 'Instantaneous Flow,' and click 'Refresh Graph' to see how much water is currently reaching the Deschutes River.

For June, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife recommends a minimum of 47 cfs in this stretch for fish health.

Tumalo Irrigation District has recently put forward a proposal to receive millions of dollars of public money from the U.S. Department of Agriculture Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) to pipe all of its canals. The purported purpose of piping the canals is to improve irrigation system efficiency so that water can be conserved and returned to the creek. However, the District’s proposal ignores other less expensive methods of improving efficiency and contradicts its own statement that all of the water that will be conserved through canal piping will be returned to our rivers and streams.

 Tumalo Irrigation District's proposal for millions of dollars of public money is unclear about how much of the water conserved would be returned to the stream.

Tumalo Irrigation District's proposal for millions of dollars of public money is unclear about how much of the water conserved would be returned to the stream.

LandWatch is committed to improving stream flows in the Upper Deschutes River Basin, and critically in Tumalo Creek, while preserving productive agricultural land uses into the future.  We are deeply concerned that the first proposal from area irrigation districts to receive public money from the NRCS chooses the most expensive method for conserving water and is unclear about its commitment to returning all water conserved to streams. With millions of dollars of public money on the line, we expect that the full amount of water savings should go towards improving stream flows

We will continue fighting for responsible use of our natural resources, along with the preservation of agricultural land.  We will also continue to pressure Central Oregon’s irrigation districts to deliver real benefits to the public, which means returning all conserved water to our rivers and streams in order to restore healthy stream flows for fish and riparian habitat in the Deschutes River Basin.

View LandWatch's comments on the Environmental Assessment for the Tumalo Irrigation District System Modernization Project